Sail Old San Juan | San Juan, Puerto Rico | 787.340.7567

Spinnaker Adventure Sail

– pictures and videos of sailing and of sailboat chili pepper, the Beneteau First Class 10 meter boat used for chartering at Sail Old San Juan, in San Juan Bay, Puerto Rico.  Guest trips, swimming, having fun, on one of the best boats in the caribbean.  Fun thing to do in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Sailboat charter, charter sailing trip. un things to do in san juan, puerto rico.  fun thing to do in puerto rico. sailing charters in san juan, puerto rico. sail old san juan. san juan weather. la concha san juan puerto rico. caribe hilton san juan.  sail on san juan bay puerto rico.  marriott san juan puerto rico. adventures in san juan, puerto rico.  bay sails, sunset sails, day sails, private charters, sailing lessons, rent a sailboat, sailboat rentals, racing sailboat rental, boat rental, captain, charter captain, caribbean, sail caribbean, viejo san juan sailing, learn to sail san juan, puerto rico. hire a yacht, yacht rental, yacht charter san juan, puerto rico.- Reservations for sail old san juan, charter sailing in san juan bay, puerto rico.  Reserve day sails, sunset sails, private charters, instruction, lessons, spinnaker runs, and have fun during your stay in san juan, puerto rico.  Fun thing to do in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  Close to Marriott hotel, La Concha hotel, viejo san juan, cruise ships and cruise ship terminals.  Short bus or taxi ride away, or walk from condado.  Have fun sailing on a performance racing boat.  Chili pepper is a beneteau First Class 10 racing boat that has been converted for day sailing.  Really fast sailing here if that is what you are looking for.  All sails are with a United States Coast Guard licensed captain, but you are welcome to help steer the boat, trim the sails, and direct where in the bay or ocean to sail.  The winds in san juan are excellent in general, the tradewinds blow at a steady 10 to 20 knots during the season, only a small shower once in a while.  But they are fun when they come, and if you don’t mind getting wet if it does happen to briefly shower, then you will have a great time.  This could be one of the most fun things to do while in San Juan, Puerto Rico, so charter a sail today.-

At Sail Old San Juan, fun is second only to safety.  We base our safe practices on generally acknowledged boating practices such as those found in the ABC’s of California boating laws and the federal regulations.  Navigation rules can be found in NAVREGs We also strive to increase fun and safety and so here is an outline of rules and regulations as they pertain to boating.  All charters are with a U.S. Coast Guard Licensed Captain, and we are subject to federal law in Puerto Rico.  Please advise us how we can improve our safety and practices to enhance the experience. Here is useful information for our captains to refer to:

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary:

www.cgaux.org/boatinged

U.S. Power Squadrons: 800-SEA-SKIL (800-732-7545)

U.S. Coast Guard Customer Infoline:

www.uscgboating.org

Weather

 

Always check NOAA website before getting underway, check the latest local conditions such as weather,

currents, rapids, flow levels, and hazards, including low-head dams. The

latest coastal conditions and wave forecasts can be found on the DBW Web

site. Detailed information can also be obtained by tuning to local radio

stations or the National Weather Radio broadcasts on frequencies of 162.400,

162.425, 162.450, 162.475, 162.525, and 162.550 MHz in areas where available or by consulting local news sources.

At selected locations in and near boating areas, storm advisories are

displayed by flag hoists or lights. Coast Guard stations and many marinas

no longer display storm advisory flags. Remaining display points are located

at some park ranger stations, marinas or municipal piers. Become familiar

with area display stations and the meanings of the signals.

EPIRB or VHF Marine Radio Licensing Information

For information on getting a license for a VHF marine radio or Emergency

Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), contact the U.S. Federal

Communications Commission (FCC) at 800-418-3676 for forms or

888-CALL-FCC (888-225-5322) for assistance.

Fueling

Most fires happen after fueling. To prevent fires, follow these common

sense rules:

Don’t smoke or strike matches.

Shut off motors. Turn off electrical equipment.

Close all windows, doors and openings.

Take portable tanks out of the boat and fill them on the dock.

Keep the filling nozzle in contact with the fill pipe or tank.

Wipe up any spilled gas with petroleum-absorbent pads. Discard the

pads in a safe manner.

Ventilate for at least five minutes. Make sure there is no odor of gasoline

anywhere in the boat.

Periodically check the system for fuel leaks.

Visually check for leaks or fuel in the bilges.

Boat Capacity – USCG six pack charter (OUPV) is limited to 6 passengers.

Single-hull motorboats less than 20 feet in length that were manufactured

after 1972 must display capacity and safe horsepower information. The

maximum weight in people, gear and motors is offered as a guide to boaters

and should not be exceeded.

While local, state, and federal laws may differ, please, keep in mind that

other states may cite operators who exceed capacity and horsepower

limitations. Some insurance companies will not insure craft exceeding

horsepower maximums, and some boat manufacturers will void any appli

cable warranties for the same reasons. Boaters using vessels and personal

watercraft without capacity plates should refer to the owner’s manual and

state law.

Loading

As the operator, it’s your responsibility to see that supplies are carefully

loaded and all passengers are properly seated. For safety onboard,

remember to:

Spread weight evenly.

Fasten gear to prevent shifting.

Keep passengers seated.

Don’t overload your boat

4

preparation

FLOAT PLAN

Operator

If overdue, contact

Vessel

Persons

Radio

Departure from

Destination

Name and address of operator

Phone number

Searches for an overdue boat have a much greater chance of being successful if the Coast Guard or other

rescue agencies have certain facts. For your own safety and before leaving on a cruise, complete this form

and leave it with a reliable person who will notify authorities if necessary.

Name and phone number of rescue agency near point of departure

Nam

e

CF Number

Length

Power, Inboard – Outboard

Rig, If Sail

Hull Color

Type/Style

Range

Speed

Number Persons Aboard

Frequencies

Place

Date/Time Depart

Car Parked License #

Trailer Parked License #

Where Parked

Place

Stops en Route

Date/Time Return

DISCLAIMER:

The Float Plan and checklist is not a definitive list of everything that may be

required for safe boating on any particular boat or boating excursion. Knowing what is required

is the responsibility of each individual boater

Federal Lateral System

U.S. waterways are marked for safe navigation by the lateral system of

buoyage. The system uses a simple arrangement of colors, shapes, numbers

and light characteristics to show the side on which a buoy should be passed

when proceeding in a given direction. The characteristics are determined by

the buoy’s position with respect to the navigable channels as the channels

are entered from seaward.

The expression “red right returning” has long been used by seafarers as

a reminder that the red buoys are kept to the starboard (right) side when

proceeding from the open sea into port (upstream). Likewise, green buoys

are kept to the port (left) side (see chart below).

Conversely, when proceeding toward the sea or leaving port, red buoys

are kept to port side and green buoys to the starboard side. Red buoys are

always even numbered, and green buoys are odd numbered. Red and white

vertically striped buoys mark the center of the channel.

1

FIXED

FLASHING (2)

FLASHING

OCCULTING

QUICK FLASH

ISO

“1” “3” “5” “7”

LIGHTED BUOY:

Odd number, increasing

toward head of navigation,

leave to port (left)

when proceeding upstream.

2

FIXED

FLASHING (2)

FLASHING

OCCULTING

QUICK FLASH

ISO

PORT SIDE:

Odd number aids, green light only

“2” “4” “6” “8”

LIGHTED BUOY:

Even number, increasing

toward head of navigation,

leave to starboard (right)

when proceeding upstream.

STARBOARD SIDE:

Even number aids, red light only

Returning to port

from seaward

This diagram shows

the course a boat

will take following

the lateral system

of buoyage.

“A”

FEDERAL CHANNEL MARKING SYSTEM

Lateral System As Seen Entering from Seaward

Uniform State Waterway Marking System

Most waterways used by California boaters are located entirely within the

boundaries of the state. The California Uniform State Waterway Marking

System has been devised for these waters. For examples of such aids, see

cha r t below.

The waterway marking system employs buoys and signs with distinctive

standard shapes to show regulatory or advisory information. These markers

are white with black letters and orange borders. They signify speed zones,

restricted areas, danger areas and general information.

Aids to navigation on state waters use red and green buoys to mark channel

limits, generally in pairs. Your boat should pass between the red buoy and

its companion green buoy.

Mooring to Buoys

Tying up to or hanging on to any navigation buoy (except a mooring buoy)

or beacon is prohibited. For examples of these types of buoys, see chart

below and on page 8.

Aids to Navigation

Navigation aids assist vessel operators in verifying their position and

cautioning them of dangers and impediments. Listed below are the common

identifiers as seen on pages 5–8:

Port-hand buoys are painted green, with green fixed or flashing lights.

Starboard-hand buoys are painted red, with red fixed or flashing lights.

Safe water buoys, also called midchannel or fairway buoys, and approach

buoys are painted with red and white vertical stripes, with flashing lights.

Preferred channel, or junction buoys, are painted with red and green

horizontal bands, with flashing lights.

Special marks (traffic separation, anchorage areas, dredging, fishnet areas,

etc.) are painted yellow. If lighted, the light may be fixed or flashing.

Navigation Rules

The inland navigation rules, commonly called “Rules of the Road,” govern

the operation of boats and specify light and sound signals on inland waters

in order to prevent collisions. Existing law requires that a complete copy of

the inland navigation rules must be kept for reference on board all boats of

39 feet 4 inches (12 meters) or more in length operating on inland waters.

A copy of the

Navigation Rules International – Inland

booklet, published by

the Coast Guard, may be ordered for a nominal fee from: USCG Navigation

Center Navcen 7310, 7323 Telegraph Road, Alexandria, VA 20598. Please call

703-313-5900 or go to

www.navcen.uscg.gov

for availability and price.

Boater Responsibility

Nothing in the rules of the road shall exonerate the operator of a vessel from

the consequences of neglecting to comply with the inland rules of the road,

or from neglecting any precaution which may be required by the ordinary

practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case.

In interpreting and complying with the inland rules of the road, due regard

shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision and to any special

circumstances, including the limitations of the vessels involved, which may

make a departure from the rules of the road necessary to avoid immediate

danger.

Navigation Signals

The law prescribes signals for vessels in sight of each other to indicate the

intended course of a vessel when necessary for safe navigation. Motorboats

should not use cross signals (i.e., answer one blast with two blasts or

two

blasts with one blast).

Sounding one short blast (1 second) of the horn or whistle shows

intention to direct course of vessel to own starboard (right).

2

blasts

Sounding two short blasts shows intention to direct course of

vessel to own port (left).

3

blasts

Sounding three short blasts indicates that the vessel’s engines are

going astern (in reverse).

5

blasts

Sounding five or more short and rapid blasts is a danger signal

used when the other vessel’s intentions are not understood or its

indicated course is dangerous.

Prolonged

blast

Sounding a prolonged blast (4 to 6 seconds) indicates restricted

visibility (see Fog Signals, page 14)

Meeting or Crossing Situations

When motorboats are in sight of one another and meeting or crossing at

a distance within half a mile of each other, each vessel shall indicate its

intended maneuver with one of the following signals:

One short blast = I intend to leave you on my port side.

Two short blasts = I intend to leave you on my starboard side.

Three short blasts = I am operating astern propulsion.

Upon hearing the one- or two-blast signal, the other vessel shall, if in

agreement, sound the same signal and take steps to affect a safe passing.

If the proposed maneuver is unsafe, the danger signal (five or more short

and rapid blasts) should be sounded, and each vessel shall take appropriate

action until a safe passing agreement is made

When meeting head-on, or nearly

so, either vessel shall signal its

intention with one short blast

which the other vessel shall answer

promptly. Both vessels should alter

their course to starboard (right) so

that each will pass to the port (left)

side of each other.

When crossing, the vessel that has the other on the starboard (right) side

shall keep out of the way and avoid crossing ahead of the other vessel. The

give-way vessel (the vessel required to keep out of the way) shall take early

and substantial action to keep well clear of the other vessel (the stand-on

vessel), which should hold course and speed. However, the stand-on vessel

may take action to avoid collision by maneuvering as soon as it becomes

apparent that the give-way vessel is not taking appropriate action.

When two motorboats are running

in the same direction and the

vessel astern desires to pass, it

shall give one short blast to

indicate a desire to pass on the

overtaken vessel’s starboard. The

vessel ahead shall answer with

one blast if the course is safe.

13

Rules of the WateRWays

2 Short Blasts

2 Short Blasts

Overtaking Vessel

OVERTAKING TO PORT SIDE

If the vessel astern desires to pass

to port of the overtaken vessel, it

shall give two short blasts. The

vessel ahead shall answer with two

short blasts if the course is safe. If

passing is unsafe, the vessel being

overtaken should answer with the

danger signal (five or more short

and rapid blasts).

A vessel approaching another vessel from the stern and overtaking it shall

keep out of the way of the overtaken vessel. The vessel being overtaken

shall hold its course and speed

If your boat nears a bend in a channel where vessels approaching from

the other direction cannot be seen, you should signal with a prolonged

blast (four to six seconds). Approaching boats within hearing should

answer with the same signal. If your signal is answered by a boat on

the farther side of the bend, then usual signals for meeting and passing

should be given upon sighting. If your signal goes unanswered, the

channel may be considered clear.

Keep your boat to the starboard side of narrow channels whenever safe

and practicable.

Sound one prolonged blast when leaving a dock or berth.

Keep out of the way of sailing vessels where courses involve the risk of

collision.

In narrow channels, do not hamper the safe passage of vessels such as

deep-draft liners and freighters, which can navigate only inside such

channels.

Rules for Sailing Vessels

When two sailing vessels are approaching one another, one of them shall

keep out of the way of the other so as to avoid the risk of collision, as

follows:

When each has the wind on a different side, the vessel with the wind on

the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.

When both have the wind on the same side, the vessel that is to

windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel that is to leeward

If a vessel with the wind on the port side sees a vessel to windward

and cannot determine with certainty whether the other vessel has the

wind on the port or the starboard side, she shall keep out of the way of

the other.

The windward side shall be deemed to be the side opposite to that on which

the mainsail is carried or, in the case of a square-rigged vessel, the side

opposite to that on which the largest fore-and-aft sail is carried.

Note: International sailing rules are the same as those above.

Fog Signals

The law also prescribes signals to identify vessels navigating in or near

areas of restricted visibility. Upon hearing a fog signal apparently forward of

the beam, you should reduce speed to the minimum at which the boat can

be kept on course, unless it has been determined by radar or other means

that the risk of collision does not exist. If necessary, use reverse propulsion.

In any event, navigate with extreme caution until any danger is over.

For motorboats:

When making your way through the water, you should

sound one prolonged blast at intervals of not more than two minutes. If

you are in the water, but stopped and making no way through the water,

sound

—at intervals of not more than two minutes—two prolonged blasts in

succession, with an interval of about two seconds between them.

For sailboats or vessels not under command, restricted in ability to

maneuver, towing or pushing another vessel, or engaged in fishing

with nets, or trawling:

You should sound—at intervals of not more than

two

minutes—one prolonged followed by two short blasts.

For boats at anchor:

You should ring—at intervals of not more than one

minute—a bell rapidly for about five seconds. In addition, one short blast

followed by one prolonged and one short blast may be sounded to an

approaching vessel to give warning of your position and of the possibility of

collision.

Note: Boats less than 39 feet 4 inches (12 meters) in length have the option

to make an efficient sound signal instead, at intervals of not more than

two

minutes. Boats less than 65 feet 7 inches (20 meters) are not required to

sound signals when anchored in a federally designated anchorage area.

OPERATIONAL LAW

Peace Officers – also applies to Puerto RIco

Every peace officer of the state, city, county, harbor district or other political

subdivision of the state is empowered to enforce California boating law.

These officers have the authority to stop and board any vessel where they

have probable cause to believe that a violation of law exists.

Peace officers are also authorized to order the operator of an unsafe vessel

to shore. Your vessel can be ordered to the nearest safe moorage if an

unsafe condition is found that cannot be corrected on the spot and if the

officer determines that continued operation would be dangerous.

Any vessel approaching, overtaking, being approached, or being overtaken

by a moving law enforcement vessel operating with a siren or an illuminated blue light, or any vessel approaching a stationary law enforcement

vessel displaying an illuminated blue light, shall:

Immediately slow to a speed sufficient to maintain steerage only.

Alter its course, within its ability, so as not to inhibit or interfere with

operation of the law enforcement vessel.

Proceed, unless otherwise directed by the law enforcement vessel

operator, at the reduced speed until beyond the law enforcement vessel’s

area of operation.

Trailering

The law prohibits you from towing a trailered vessel containing a passenger,

except when you are launching or retrieving a vessel. For more information,

please visit:

http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Pubs/Trailer/TrailerSailors.pdf.

Stolen Vessels

If a numbered vessel is stolen, the owner or legal owner should notify local

law enforcement as soon as possible. The owner shall also notify the local

law enforcement agency if the vessel reported stolen is recovered. For more

information, please visit:

http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Pubs/Marine_Secur/

MarineSecurity.pdf.

County and City Laws

In addition to state law, many counties, cities and districts have special laws

or ordinances that restrict activities in certain areas, prohibit certain acts at

certain times or establish additional requirements. These ordinances may

regulate speed, set aside specific areas or hours for special purposes, and

prohibit acts that are contrary to public interest. Boaters must comply with

these local rules as well as with state law. Check with your local waterway

operator for special laws or ordinances in your area

Age Restrictions

No person under 16 years of age may operate a boat with a motor of more

than 15 horsepower, except for a sailboat that does not exceed 30 feet in

length or a dinghy used directly between a moored boat and the shore (or

between two moored boats). The law allows children 12–15 years of age to

operate boats with a motor of more than 15 horsepower or sailboats over

30 feet if supervised on board by an adult at least 18 years of age. Violating

these provisions constitutes an infraction.

Speed

Speed is limited by law for certain conditions and areas. The maximum

speed for motorboats within 100 feet of a bather (but not a water skier)

and within 200 feet of a bathing beach, swimming float, diving platform or

lifeline, passenger landing being used, or landing where boats are tied up is

5

miles per hour.

A safe speed should be maintained at all times so that: (1) action can

be taken to avoid collision; and (2) your boat can stop within a distance

appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions. In restricted

visibility, motorboats should have the engines ready for immediate

maneuvering. You should be prepared to stop the vessel within the space of

half the distance of forward visibility.

Carbon Monoxide

It is a violation of California law to operate a vessel’s motor or generator

while someone is: (1) teak surfing, platform dragging or bodysurfing behind

the vessel; or (2) while someone is occupying or holding onto a swim

platform, swim deck, swim step, or swim ladder, except for a very brief

period of time when a person is assisting with the docking or departure of

the vessel or exiting or entering the vessel, or while the vessel is engaged in

law enforcement or emergency rescue activity.

Teak surfing or platform

dragging means holding onto

the swim platform, swim deck,

swim step, swim ladder, or any

portion of the transom exterior

of a motorized vessel for any

amount of time while the vessel

is underway at any speed. The

law requires that a set of carbon

monoxide warning stickers be

placed on the transom and helm

of all new and used motorized boats sold in California. For a pamphlet on

the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning and a set of warning decals,

please visit:

http://www.dbw.ca.gov/BoaterInfo/CODanger.aspx.

Reckless or Negligent Operation of a Vessel

No person shall operate any vessel or manipulate any water skis, aquaplane

or similar device in a reckless or negligent manner so as to endanger the

life, limb or property of any person. Examples of such operation include, but

are not limited to:

Riding on the bow, gunwale or transom of a vessel under way, propelled

by machinery, when such position is not protected by railing or other

reasonable deterrent to falling overboard or riding in a position or

manner that is obviously dangerous. These provisions shall not apply to

a vessel’s crew in the act of anchoring, mooring or making fast to a dock

or another vessel, or in the necessary management of a sail.

Maneuvering towed skiers or devices so as to pass the towline over

another vessel or its skier.

Navigating a vessel, skis or other devices between a towing vessel and its

tow or tows.

Operating under the influence of intoxicants or narcotics.

Other actions such as speeding in confined or restricted areas, “buzzing” or

“wetting down” others, or skiing at prohibited times or in restricted areas

can also be considered reckless or negligent operations.

Hit-and-Run Accidents

Any person involved in a boating accident that results in injury, death

or disappearance who is convicted of leaving the scene without either:

(1) furnishing appropriate information to others involved or to any peace

officer at the scene; and/or (2) rendering any reasonable assistance to any

injured person, is liable for a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for up

to four years, or both. A person responsible for an accident that results in

serious injury or death can be subject to a conviction of manslaughter and

sentenced to an additional five years in state prison for fleeing the scene

Operation of a Vessel While Intoxicated – Sail Old San Juan has a zero alcohol tolerance for all captains.  Refrain from alcohol 24 hours before sailing.

Alcohol is a factor in about 50 percent of all fatal motorboat accidents in

California. State law specifies that:

1

. No person shall operate any vessel, water skis or similar device while

under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs. No person who is

addicted to any drug shall operate any vessel, water skis or similar device.

2.

No person 21 years of age or older shall operate any vessel, water skis or

similar device who has 0.08 percent or more, by weight, of alcohol in his or

her blood. A level of at least 0.05 percent, but less than 0.08 percent, may be

used with other evidence in determining whether the person was under the

influence of alcohol. A person under 21 years of age or older who has been

arrested for operating a mechanically propelled vessel “under the influence”

may be requested to submit to a chemical test to determine blood-alcohol

content. Refusal may result in increased penalties upon conviction. A

person convicted of operating a vessel while intoxicated could receive up to

a $1,000 fine and six months in jail.

3.

No person under 21 years of age may operate a vessel, water skis or

similar device who has 0.01 percent or more of alcohol in his or her blood

by weight. Penalties may include a fine of up to $250 and participation in an

alcohol education or community service program.

Designated Driver Theory

Designating a driver is not enough on vessels. The concept works well in

cars, but drunken passengers on boats can easily fall overboard, swim near

the propeller or cause loading problems by leaning over the side or standing

up in small vessels, causing vessels to capsize. Everyone who drinks alcohol

on board is at risk. If you do drink, wear a life jacket.

Court-Ordered Boating Education

Any person convicted of a moving violation of the Harbors and Navigation

Code or Federal Rules of the Road, or while operating a vessel in violation

of the Anthony Farr and Stacey Beckett Boating Safety Act of 2004 (Carbon

Monoxide law), shall be ordered by the court to complete and pass a boating

safety course approved by DBW.

Proof of completion and passage of the course must be submitted to the

court within seven months of the time of the conviction

Personal Watercraft Operation

A personal watercraft (PWC), popularly known as a jet ski, is a vessel

13

feet in length or less, propelled by machinery, that is designed to be

operated by a person sitting, standing or kneeling on the vessel rather than

in the conventional manner of sitting or standing inside the vessel. PWCs

are subject to the same laws governing the operation of motorboats of the

same size. Boaters on board a PWC without capacity plates should reference

the owner’s manual and state law.

Registration:

For proper display of registration numbers and stickers, see

the “Registration” section of this booklet.

Life Jackets:

Every person on board a PWC and anyone being towed behind

a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved Type I, II, III or V life jacket.

Lanyard/Self-Circling Device:

The law requires anyone operating a PWC

equipped with a lanyard cutoff switch to attach the lanyard to his or her

person. Operating a PWC equipped with a self-circling device is prohibited

if the device has been altered.

Nighttime Operation Prohibited:

The law prohibits the operation of a PWC

at any time from sunset to sunrise, even if the PWC is equipped with proper

navigational lights.

Operator Age:

It is an infraction for anyone under 16 years of age to oper

ate a motorboat of more than 15 horsepower, including a PWC. Any person

who permits someone under age 16 to do so is also guilty of an infraction.

Children 12–15 years of age may operate a motorboat of more than 15 horse

power if supervised by an adult on board who is at least 18 years of age.

Reasonable and Prudent Operation:

Under California law, no person shall

operate any craft in a reckless or negligent manner so as to endanger the

life, limb or property of any individual. Some examples are:

Navigating a vessel, skis or other devices between a towing vessel and its

tow or tows.

Operating under the influence of intoxicants or narcotics.

Jumping or attempting to jump the wake of another vessel within

100

feet of the other vessel, which constitutes unsafe operation.

Note: Other actions that constitute unsafe operation include: (1) operating

a PWC toward any person or vessel in the water and turning sharply so as

to spray the person or vessel; and (2) operating at a rate of speed and in

proximity to another vessel so that either operator is required to swerve at the

last minute to avoid collision. A PWC Course can be taken online at:

http://www.dbw.ca.gov/BoaterInfo/PWCOnline/index.html

.

Water Skiing

When using a boat to tow someone on water skis or an aquaplane, there

must be one other person in the boat—in addition to the operator—who can

observe the person being towed. The observer must be at least 12 years of

age. Other tow sports, such as wake boarding, knee boarding, and tubing,

must follow the same rules and guidelines as skiers.

Life Jackets:

Effective Jan 1, 2001, California law provides that any person

being towed behind a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved Type I,

II, III or V life jacket. Exceptions: The law does not apply to performers

engaged in professional exhibitions, official regattas, marine parades or

tournaments. Any person engaged in slalom skiing on a marked course or

in barefoot, jump or trick water skiing, may instead wear a wetsuit designed

for the activity and labeled by the manufacturer as a water ski wetsuit.

However, for each skier who elects to wear a wetsuit, a Type I, II, III or V

life jacket still must be carried on board.

Note: Inflatable personal flotation

devices are not approved for use while water skiing

.

Towing:

Water skis

and aquaplanes must

not be operated in a

manner to endanger

the safety of people or

property. Passing the

towline over another

vessel or skier and

towing a skier or

navigating between a

vessel and its tow are

prohibited. Towing a

skier does not give the

vessel operator any

special privileges. You

must observe the rules

of the road.

The towing of water

skiers from sunset to

sunrise is prohibited by state law. Local laws may also restrict skiing at

specific times during the day and in certain areas. For more information,

please visit:

http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Pubs/Watski/TowingSports.pdf

.

WATER SKI FLAG

The operator of a vessel involved in towing a skier

must display, or cause to be displayed, a red or

orange water ski flag to indicate:

A downed skier

A skier in the water preparing to ski

A ski line extended for the vessel

A ski in the water in the vicinity of the vessel

The flag must be no less than 12 inches on each

side and be in the shape of a square or rectangle.

The display of the ski flag does not in itself restrict

the use of the water, but when operating in the

area, boaters should exercise caution.

ALPHA FLAG

Whenever the size of a vessel engaged in diving

operations during daytime hours makes it

impracticable to exhibit the daytime shapes required

of a vessel restricted in its ability to maneuver, a

rigid replica of the international blue-and-white

code flag (Alpha) is required to be displayed. The

flag must measure not less than 1

meter (3 ft. 3 in.)

in height and must be visible all round the horizon.

For boats tending free-swimming divers where the

diving does not interfere with the maneuverability of

the boat, the alpha flag is not required and they may

display the “divers down” flag.

DIVERS DOWN FLAG

State law recognizes that a red flag with a white

diagonal stripe

commonly called the divers

down flag

indicates a person engaged in diving

in the immediate area. Displaying the divers down

flag is not required by law and does not in itself

restrict the use of the water. When operating in an

area where this flag is displayed, boaters should

exercise caution

Radio Procedures/Marine Emergency Distress

A.

If you are in distress

(i.e., threatened by grave and imminent danger) or

observe another vessel in distress, transmit the International Distress Call

on Channel 16: “MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY — THIS IS

.”

State the call sign of the vessel in distress—or the name of your boat if no

call sign has been assigned—and repeat it three times. SPEAK SLOWLY

A ND CLE A R LY.

If you are aboard the vessel in trouble, state:

1.

WHO you are (your vessel’s call letters and name).

2.

WHERE you are (give your vessel’s position in latitude/longitude or

true bearing and distance in nautical miles from a widely known

geographical point). Remember that local names known only in the

immediate vicinity are confusing.

3.

WHAT the problem is aboard your boat.

4. Type of

assistance needed.

5.

Number of people aboard and condition of any injured.

6.

Present seaworthiness of your vessel.

7.

Description of your vessel (length, type, cabin, masts, power, color of

hull, superstructure and trim).

8.

Your listening frequency and schedule.

If you observe another vessel in distress, give:

1.

Your position and, if possible, the bearing and distance of the vessel

in d if ficu lt y.

2.

Nature of distress.

3.

Description of vessel in distress (see item 7 above).

4.

Your intentions, course, speed, etc.

5.

Your radio call sign, name of your vessel, listening frequency and

schedule.

NOTE: The international sign for an aircraft that wants to direct a surface

craft to a vessel in distress is:

Circling the surface craft, opening and closing

the throttle or changing propeller pitch (noticeable by change in sound) while

crossing ahead of the surface craft, and proceeding in the direction of the

vessel in distress. If you receive such a signal, you should follow the aircraft.

If you cannot do so, try to inform the aircraft by any available means.

If your assistance is no longer needed, the aircraft will cross your wake,

opening and closing the throttle or changing the propeller pitch. If you are

radio-equipped, you should attempt to communicate with the aircraft on

Channel 16 when the aircraft makes the above signals or makes any obvious

attempt to attract your attention. In the event you cannot communicate by

radio, be alert for a message block dropped from the aircraft.

B. If you need information or assistance from the Coast Guard

(other than

in a distress), call COAST GUARD on Channel 16 (The Distress and Calling

Frequency). In this situation, you will normally be shifted to a common working

frequency (21, 22 or 23) allowing the DISTRESS frequency to remain open.

Radio Checks:

Do not use Channel 16 to call the Coast Guard merely for a radio

check. Such use is prohibited by the Federal Communications Commission.

C. After the emergency is over, notify the Coast Guard promptly.

Accident Reporting

Boat operators involved in an accident must: (1) provide their name, address

and vessel registration number to other involved parties; (2) render assis

tance to any injured people; and (3) in case of a death or disappearance,

report the accident without delay to law enforcement officials.

Boat operators or owners must also make a written report of a boating

accident to DBW within 48 hours when:

A person dies within 24 hours of the accident, disappears, or is injured

and requires medical treatment beyond first aid.

Total damage to all vessels involved and other property is more than

$500 or there is complete loss of a vessel.

In all other incidents requiring a written accident report, the report must

be made within 10 days of the accident. Failure to comply with the above

requirements is punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 or imprisonment up to

six months, or both.

This booklet contains an accident report form that may be used for such

incidents. Forms are also available through most sheriffs’ and harbormasters’

offices and many police departments. They may also be obtained by

contacting DBW or by visiting

www.dbw.ca.gov.

False Search and Rescue Calls

Any individual who reports to a state or local agency that an emergency

exists, knowing that the report is false, is guilty of a misdemeanor and can

be found liable for the expense of the emergency response. An emergency

includes any condition that results in, or could result in, the response of a

public official in an authorized emergency vehicle, vessel or aircraft.

It is a felony

for any individual to report or cause any report to be made to any

state or local government agency that an emergency exists if he or she knows

or should know that the response to the report is likely to cause death or great

bodily injury and such injury or death is sustained by any person as a result

of the false report.

REQUIRED EQUIPMENT

OUPV required equipment must be up to date at all times.

Captain must have current license, TWIC card, be enrolled in random drug testing program with proof, and be on commercial policy.

General Information

Recreational vessels are required to carry specified safety equipment, which

may vary according to type of propulsion, type of construction, area and

time of use, and number of people aboard. Unless otherwise noted, all

required equipment must be:

Coast Guard-approved

Kept in good, serviceable condition

Readily accessible

Of the proper type and/or size

Recreational vessels may carry extra equipment that is not Coast Guard-

approved, provided that minimum requirements for approved equipment

are satisfied. For equipment purposes, sailboats, canoes, rowboats and

inflatable rafts equipped with motors are considered to be “motorboats.”

Requirements vary considerably for commercial vessels and vessels engaged

in racing.

Note: For a list of recommended additional equipment, see the chart on

page

45.

Sailboats and Manually Propelled Vessels

Life jackets:

Vessels less than 16 feet in length and all canoes and kayaks,

regardless of length, must carry one Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-

approved life jacket for each person on board. Life jackets must be readily

accessible and fit the intended wearer properly.

Vessels 16 feet and over, except canoes and kayaks, must have one Type

I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved life jacket for each person aboard, plus

at least one Type IV throwable device. The throwable device must be kept

where it is immediately available. Life jackets must be readily accessible

and fit the intended wearer properly.

Note: An inflatable life jacket must be

worn to be considered readily accessible.

Navigation Lights:

All vessels are required to display navigation lights

between sunset and sunrise and during times of restricted visibility. In

inland and international waters, sailing vessels under sail alone shall

exhibit navigation lights shown on page 40. The tricolored lantern and the

all-round green and red lights should never be used together.

A sailing vessel of less than 23 feet (7 meters) in length shall, if practicable,

exhibit those lights prescribed or have ready at hand an electric torch or

lighted lantern showing a white light which shall be exhibited in sufficient

time to prevent collision. A vessel under oars may display those lights

prescribed for sailing vessels or have ready at hand an electric torch or

lighted lantern showing a white light, which shall be exhibited in sufficient

time to prevent collision.

Sound Signaling Devices:

A vessel of less than 39 feet 4 inches (12 meters)

is not required to carry a whistle or bell, but must be able to provide some

other means of making an efficient sound signal.

Visual Distress Signals (Coastal Waters Only):

Boats less than 16 feet;

manually propelled craft of any size; sailboats under 26 feet of completely

open construction and not equipped with propulsion machinery; and boats

competing in an organized marine parade, regatta, race, or similar event

are only required between sunset and sunrise to carry aboard devices that

are suitable for night use (see page 44).

Motorboats Less Than 16 Feet in Length

Life jackets:

One Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved life jacket must

be carried for each person on board. Life jackets must be readily accessible

and fit the intended wearer properly.

Note: An inflatable life jacket must be

worn to be considered readily accessible.

Fire Extinguisher:

One Type B-I Coast Guard-approved fire extinguisher

must be carried when no fixed fire extinguishing system is installed in

machinery spaces. Extinguishers are not required for outboard motorboats

less than 26 feet in length and of open construction. No portable extinguish

ers are required if an approved, fixed fire extinguishing system is installed

in machinery spaces.

Backfire Flame Arrestor:

A Coast Guard-approved backfire flame arrestor is

required for inboard gasoline motors that are not exposed to the atmosphere

above the gunwale level.

Muffling System:

An effective muffling system is required for the exhaust

of each internal combustion engine. Unmodified outboards usually meet

legal requirements (see page 37).

Ventilation System:

See page 38.

Sound Signaling Devices:

A vessel of less than 39 feet 4 inches (12 meters)

must be able to provide a means of making an efficient sound signal, but is

not required to carry a whistle or bell.

Visual Distress Signals (Coastal Waters Only):

Boats less than 16 feet of

completely open construction and not equipped with propulsion machinery,

and boats competing in an organized marine parade, regatta, race, or

similar event are only required between sunset and sunrise to carry aboard

devices that are suitable for night use (see page 44).

Navigation Lights:

Navigation lights must be kept in serviceable condition

and displayed between sunset and sunrise and at times of restricted

visibility. For motorboats operating during these times, see page 40.

Motorboats 16 Feet to Less Than 26 Feet in Length

Life jackets:

One Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved wearable life

jacket must be carried for each person aboard. Life jackets must be readily

accessible and of an appropriate size for the intended wearer. In addition,

the vessel must carry an approved Type IV throwable device, which should

be immediately available.

Note: An inflatable life jacket must be worn to be

considered readily accessible.

Fire Extinguisher:

One Type B-I Coast Guard-approved fire extinguisher

must be carried when no fixed fire extinguishing system is installed in

machinery spaces. Extinguishers are not required for outboard motorboats

less than 26 feet in length and of open construction. No portable extinguish

ers are required if an approved fixed fire extinguishing system is installed

in machinery spaces.

Backfire Flame Arrestor:

A Coast Guard-approved backfire flame arrestor is

required for inboard gasoline motors that are not exposed to the atmosphere

above the gunwale level.

Muffling System:

An effective muffling system is required for the exhaust

of each internal combustion engine. Unmodified outboards usually meet

legal requirements (see page 37).

Ventilation System:

See page 38.

Sound Signaling Devices:

A vessel of less than 39 feet 4 inches (12 meters)

must be able to provide a means of making an efficient sound signal, but is

not required to carry a whistle or bell.

Visual Distress Signals (Coastal Waters Only):

All boats 16 feet or more

in length must carry devices aboard at all times. Boaters must carry

either

:

(a)

devices that are suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use;

or

(b) devices that can be used for both day and night use (see page 44).

Navigation Lights:

Navigation lights must be kept in serviceable condition

and displayed between sunset and sunrise and at times of restricted

visibility. For motorboats operating during these times, see page 40.

Motorboats 26 Feet to Less Than 40 Feet in Length – Chili Pepper will fall under this category when motoring.  Must also have commercial PFD’s

Life jackets:

One Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved wearable life

jacket must be carried for each person aboard. Life jackets must be readily

accessible and properly fit the intended wearer.

Note: An inflatable life jacket

must be worn to be considered readily accessible.

In addition, the vessel must

carry an approved Type IV throwable device, which should be immediately

available.

Fire Extinguisher:

Two Type B-I or one Type B-II Coast Guard-approved fire

extinguishers must be carried when no fixed fire extinguishing system is

installed in machinery spaces. With a fixed system in the machinery space,

one Type B-I fire extinguisher must be carried.

Backfire Flame Arrestor:

A Coast Guard-approved backfire flame arrestor is

required for inboard gasoline motors that are not exposed to the atmosphere

above the gunwale level.

Muffling System:

An effective muffling system is required for the exhaust

of each internal combustion engine. Unmodified outboards usually meet

legal requirements (see page 37).

Ventilation System:

See page 38.

Sound Signaling Devices:

A vessel of less than 39 feet 4 inches (12 meters)

must be able to provide a means of making an efficient sound signal, but

is not required to carry a whistle or bell. (For vessels over 12 meters, see

page

32.)

Visual Distress Signals (Coastal Waters Only):

All boats 16 feet or more in

length must carry devices aboard at all times. Boaters must carry

either

:

(a) devices that are suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use:

or

(b) devices that can be used for both day and night use (see page 44).

Navigation Lights:

Navigation lights must be kept in serviceable condition

and displayed between sunset and sunrise and at times of restricted

visibility. For motorboats operating during these times, see page 40.

Motorboats 40 Feet to 65 Feet in Length

Life jackets:

One Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved wearable life

jacket must be carried for each person aboard. Life jackets must be readily

accessible and properly fit the intended wearer.

Note: An inflatable life

jacket must be worn to be considered readily accessible.

In addition, the

vessel must carry an approved Type IV throwable device, which should be

immediately available.

Fire Extinguisher:

Three B-I or one B-I and one Coast Guard-approved fire

extinguisher must be carried when no fixed fire extinguishing system is

installed in machinery spaces. With a fixed system in the machinery space,

two Type B-I or one Type B-II extinguisher must be carried.

Backfire Flame Arrestor:

A Coast Guard-approved backfire flame arrestor is

required for inboard gasoline motors that are not exposed to the atmosphere

above the gunwale level.

Muffling System:

An effective muffling system is required for the exhaust

of each internal combustion engine. Unmodified outboards usually meet

legal requirements (see page 37).

Ventilation System:

See page 38.

Sound Signaling Devices:

Vessels 39 feet 4 inches (12 meters) or more in

length are required to carry a whistle and a bell.

Visual Distress Signals (Coastal Waters Only):

All boats 16 feet or more in

length must carry devices aboard at all times. Boaters must carry

either

:

(a) devices that are suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use;

or

(b) devices that can be used for both day and night use (see page 44).

Navigation Lights:

Navigation lights must be kept in serviceable condition

and displayed between sunset and sunrise and at times of restricted

visibility. For motorboats operating during these times, see page 40.

Life Jackets

All boats, powered or non-powered, must carry at least one wearable

Coast Guard-approved life jacket (also called a personal flotation device or

PFD) for every person aboard. Life jackets bearing Coast Guard approval

are identified by Types I, II, III, IV or V. Coast Guard approval is shown

by a stencil marking or tag on the life jacket. This tag or marking shows

the name and address of the manufacturer and the Coast Guard approval

number. It also shows the amount of flotation in the device and the

type

(I, II, III, IV or V). Failure to have a sufficient number of approved

devices aboard constitutes a violation of state and federal law.

California boating law requires that all Type I, II and III lifejackets must

be readily accessible and all Type IV (throwable) flotation devices must

be immediately available.

Note: An inflatable life jacket must be worn to be

considered readily accessible.

They must be kept in serviceable condition. If

they are badly torn, damaged, rotted, punctured, or otherwise unserviceable,

they no longer meet legal requirements and should be replaced.

The minimum requirements are:

All boats 16 feet or more in length, except canoes and kayaks: One

wearable life jacket (Type I, II, III or V) for each person on board and

one throwable (Type IV) device in each boat.

Canoes and kayaks of any length and all other boats less than 16 feet in

length: A single Type I, II, III or V life jacket for each person on board.

Under state law, it is an infraction, punishable by a fine of up to $250, to

operate a vessel that is 26 feet or less in length unless

every child under

13

years of age on board is

wearing

a Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved

life jacket.

The law does not apply to: (1) the operator of a sailboat on which

every child under age 13 is restrained by a harness tethered to the sailboat;

or (2) the operator of a vessel on which every child under age 13 is in an

enclosed cabin.

Inflatable Life Jackets:

The Coast Guard approved inflatable life jackets in

1996. However, only certain brands are Coast Guard-approved, and some

are only appropriate for adults. Proper use of inflatable life jackets, including

appropriate age limits, varies by manufacturer. Please review the owner’s

manual and information pamphlet carefully before purchasing this type of

life jacket. While activation upon impact is not a required feature, inflatables

must be equipped at a minimum with both manual (pull) and oral (blow)

inflation systems. Inflatable life jackets must have a full cylinder and all status

indicators on the inflator must be green to satisfy requirements.

Note: An

inflatable life jacket must be worn in order to be considered readily accessible

.

Life jackets must be wearable (Type I, II, III or V), not throwable-type, life

jackets. Inflatables are not recommended for non-swimmers and are not

intended for use while participating in tow or whitewater paddle sports, or

while on a personal watercraft (PWC).

Every person on board a PWC and anyone being towed behind a vessel must

wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket. (For exceptions, see “Water Skiing.”)

California boating law does not require wearing life jackets while aboard a

vessel, other than as noted in the requirements above and those for some

Type V life jackets and for children under age 13. However,

DBW highly

recommends that all boaters wear life jackets.

All wearable life jackets

must properly fit the intended wearer. Check the manufacturer’s label on the

life jacket for the intended use, size restrictions and instructions on how to

wear the life jacket.

Non-approved devices such as ski belts may be carried aboard as excess

equipment only. For more information, please visit:

http://www.dbw.

ca.gov/Pubs/Pfd/PFDs.pdf

.

36

RequiRed equipment

Underwater Maneuvering Devices

A person using any underwater maneuvering device is exempt from

wearing a life jacket. An underwater maneuvering device is any towed or

self-powered apparatus designed for underwater use that someone can pilot

through diving, turning and surfacing maneuvers.

Fire Extinguishers

Motorboats are required to carry readily accessible fire extinguishers

accepted for marine use by the Coast Guard. The size and number of

extinguishers accepted for use on motorboats depend on the size of your

boat and whether or not you have a fixed extinguishing system installed

aboard. Fire extinguishers are not required for outboard pleasure boats

less than 26 feet in length, or those that are not carrying passengers for

hire, have no permanently installed fuel tanks, or do not have spaces in

which explosive or flammable gases or vapors can collect. (For specific

requirements, see

Table A

.) The minimum size approved for use aboard

pleasure boats is the B-I size extinguisher.

All extinguishers must be readily accessible (preferably not stowed next

to common fire sources) and must be kept in serviceable condition. An

extinguisher is suitable for marine use when it bears a label that has either:

Coast Guard approval numbers, “Marine Type USCG” or both markings.

Information stating that it is listed with Underwriters Laboratories (UL)

and suitable for marine use. The extinguisher must be of the type and

size described in

Table B.

UL-listed extinguishers must bear a UL rating

of 5-B:C or higher.

Note: All recently manufactured, UL Marine Type 5 extinguishers will bear

both the UL and Coast Guard label markings

All carbon tetrachloride extinguishers and others with toxic vaporizing

liquids such as chlorobromomethane are neither approved nor accepted as

required fire extinguishers on any motorboats.

Remember, the number required by law is only the minimum. Extra

extinguishers provide additional safety.

Muffling Systems

Any motorboat operated on California inland waters or coastal waters up to

one mile from shore must be muffled or otherwise prevented from exceed

ing the following noise levels when measured by the Stationary Sound Level

Measurement.

Procedure for Pleasure Motorboats (SAE J2005):

90 dB (A) for engines manufactured before Jan 1, 1993.

88 dB (A) for engines manufactured on or after Jan 1, 1993.

All motorboat noise levels must be below 75 dB (A) when measured by the

Shoreline Sound Level Measurement Procedure (SAE J1970). Authorities

generally agree that unbaffled exhaust pipes (stacks) do not meet any of the

above noise level requirements.

Ventilation Systems

All motorboats or motor vessels, except open boats, made after 1940 and

using gasoline as a fuel must have at least two ventilator ducts fitted with

cowls or their equivalent for the efficient removal of explosive or flammable

gases from all engine and fuel tank compartment bilges. If engine and fuel

tank compartments are closed and separated, two such ventilation systems

are required.

At least one exhaust duct must be installed to extend from the open

atmosphere to the lower portion of the bilge, and at least one intake duct

must be installed to extend to a point at least midway to the bilge (or at

least below the carburetor air intake level). The cowls must be located and

trimmed for maximum effectiveness to prevent displaced fumes from being

recirculated.

Boats built after July 31, 1980, that have a gasoline engine for electrical

generation, mechanical power or propulsion must be equipped with an

operable ventilation system.

A compartment containing a permanently installed gasoline engine must

either be open to the atmosphere or ventilated by an exhaust blower

system.

The intake duct for an exhaust blower must be in the lower one-third of

the compartment and above the normal level of accumulated bilge water.

A combination of more than one exhaust blower may be used to meet

specified requirements.

Boats equipped with either outboard motors or “open” construction inboard

motors (i.e., not enclosed) are exempt from ventilation requirements.

Two-Stroke Engines – none on board

There is no statewide prohibition on the use of high emission two-stroke

vessel engines, and there is no plan to prohibit them. A small number of

cities, counties or districts have adopted ordinances on drinking water

reservoirs that restrict or ban the use of high emission, carbureted or

electronic fuel injection (EFI) two-stroke marine engines.

Backfire Flame Control Devices

Backfire flame control devices are designed to prevent open flame from

leaving the carburetion system in the event of a backfire. Vessels equipped

with gasoline engines, except outboard motors, must have one of the

following backfire flame control devices installed on the engine. These can

be either:

Coast Guard-approved backfire flame arrestor, suitably secured to the air

intake with a flame-tight connection

Backfire flame arrestor marked “SAE-1928” or “UL 1111” and suitably

secured to the air intake with a flame-tight connection

Approved engine air and fuel induction system that provides adequate

protection from propagation of backfire flame to the atmosphere,

equivalent to that provided by an acceptable backfire flame arrestor

Flame-tight metallic carburetor air intake attachment, located or

positioned so backfire flames would be dispersed to the atmosphere

outside the vessel

Note: This last device listed must be acceptable to the Coast Guard and

designed so that flames will not endanger the vessel, people on board, or

nearby vessels and structures.

Running Lights – all LED

Operating a boat at night without lights is not only dangerous, but is against

the law. Running lights make it possible for boat operators to properly

interpret and react to the movements of other boats in darkness.

If a boat

is used exclusively in the daylight hours and not during periods of restricted

visibility, running lights are not required.

All vessels must show required running lights between sunset and sunrise

and during periods of restricted visibility. Light requirements vary based

on vessel length and propulsion type. In most cases, requirements for a

particular vessel are the same under both inland and international rules.

Power Driven Vessels:

A recreational motor-powered vessel underway

is required to display a masthead light forward, red and green sidelights,

and a sternlight, as indicated in

Figure 1

. A recreational powerboat under

39

feet 4 inches (12 meters) may instead display a 360

o

all-round sternlight

and combination red and green sidelights (see

Figure 2

).

Sailing Vessels and Vessels Under Oar:

Running light requirements for

such vessels are as follows:

A sailing vessel operating under power of sail only must exhibit

sidelights and a sternlight (see

Figure 3

).

A sailing vessel of less than 23 feet (7 meters) in length must, if practica

ble, exhibit sidelights and a sternlight or lighted lantern showing a white

light, which must be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision

(see

Figure 4

).

A sailing vessel operating under machinery power only, or under power

and sails, is considered a power-driven vessel and must display the

proper lights for a powerboat (see

Figure 5

).

A vessel under oars may display those lights prescribed for sailing

vessels or have ready at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing

a white light, which must be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent

collision (see

Figure 6

).

The running lights described above are the most common, but boaters

operating at night should be aware that there are other possible combina

tions of lights.

Anchor Lights – Secondary on Chili Pepper as there is no mast head light.

An anchor light is an all-round white light exhibited where it can best be

seen and is visible for two miles. Power-driven vessels and sailing vessels at

anchor must display anchor lights, with these exceptions:

Vessels less than 23 feet (7 meters) in length are not required to display

anchor lights unless anchored in or near a narrow channel, fairway or

anchorage, or where other vessels normally navigate.

Vessels less than 65 feet 7 inches (20 meters) in inland waters when

at anchor in a special anchorage area designated by the Secretary of

Transportation are not required to exhibit an anchor light.

Visual Distress-Signaling Devices

Vessels operating on coastal waters must carry the required number of

approved visual distress-signaling devices selected from

Table C.

Coastal

waters include territorial seas and those waters directly connected to those

seas where any entrance exceeds two nautical miles between opposite

shorelines to the first point where the largest distance between shorelines

narrows to two miles (e.g., bays, sounds, harbors, rivers, inlets, etc.). The

carriage requirements for vessels operating on coastal waters are:

All boats 16 feet or more in length must carry devices aboard at all times.

Boaters must carry

either

: (a) devices suitable for day use and devices

suitable for night use;

or

(b) devices suitable for both day and night use.

Boats less than 16 feet; manually propelled craft of any size; sailboats

under 26 feet of completely open construction and not equipped with

propulsion machinery; and boats competing in any organized marine

parade, regatta, race, or similar event are only required to carry aboard

devices that are suitable for night use between sunset and sunrise.

All visual distress-signaling devices must be Coast Guard-approved, readily

accessible and in serviceable condition. Devices carried aboard beyond the

date stamped on each device will not meet legal minimum requirements.

Some of the recognized signals for indicating distress and need of

assistance are shown on page 43. On coastal waters, boaters must carry

Coast Guard-approved visual distress-signaling devices.

Marine Sanitation Devices

While vessels are not required to have a marine toilet on board, if your boat

has one, it must be connected to a Coast Guard-approved Type I, II, or III

marine sanitation device (MSD).

Federal law forbids dumping sewage—treated or untreated—or any waste

derived from sewage into the lakes, reservoirs or fresh water impoundments

of this state. Federal regulations and equipment standards established jointly

by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Coast Guard

govern the use of MSDs. Disconnecting, bypassing or operating a MSD

so as to discharge sewage into water is a misdemeanor, unless expressly

authorized or permitted by law.

GREEN BOATING GUIDELINES

Boater Responsibility

Boaters play an important role in protecting the health of California’s

waterways. Boat sewage, graywater, cleaning products, spilled fuel and oil,

trash and aquatic invasive species are all potential sources of pollution.

Government alone cannot protect California’s environment. Every boater

must take responsibility for pollution prevention and try to minimize the

environmental and public health impacts from boating activities.

For additional information on green boating guidelines beyond that con

tained in this booklet, visit the following Web site:

http://www.coastal.

ca.gov/ccbn/ccbndx.html.

Boat Maintenance

Products used to wash boat hulls and decks often contain toxic ingredients

that are harmful to the marine environment. Degreasers dry the natural oils

that fish need for their gills to take in oxygen. Underwater hull cleaning can

leave toxic paint residues in harbor sediments.

Limit in-water maintenance and perform cleaning where debris can be

captured and disposed of properly. Marina tenants should check whether

or not their marina has established guidelines for the type of boat

maintenance work that can be done in the slip.

Use environmentally friendly cleaning methods and less-toxic, biode

gradable cleaning products. Federal law requires that most hazardous

products include specific types of information on their labels.

Signal

words, such as “danger/poison,” “warning”, or “caution,” can give you a

general indication of the toxicity of a product. If you want more informa

tion on a product’s contents, ask your retailer or contact the manufacturer

for the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). The MSDS will list any

constituents considered a hazardous substance by the federal govern

ment. Cross check product contents with the information found in the

Proposition 65 list

http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/Newlist.html.

Do not sand in heavy wind. Sand with vacuum sanders or grinders (not

steel wool), which automatically collect and store paint, varnish, or wood

dust before it can get into the marine environment (or eyes or lungs).

Some boat yards have these tools for rent.

Avoid products with phosphates, ammonia, lye, sodium hypochlorite

(bleach), chlorinated hydrocarbons (methylene chloride, perchloroethy

lene, or trichloroethylene), and petroleum distillates.

Keep absorbents or rags within reach to wipe up spills

Suspend a tarp or polyethylene sheet between the boat and the dock to

catch any spills, dust, or debris that would otherwise end up in the water.

Consider alternative, non-biocide hull coatings. Clean the bottom with a

soft, non-abrasive sponge. Use hull cleaning companies who use green

management practices such as monitoring their divers and using non-

abrasive scrubbing agents. For more information:

ucanr.org/sites/coast/

Oil and Gas

Oil and gasoline contain hydrocarbons and heavy metals that pollute

and are toxic to aquatic life. Oil can coat the feathers and fur of wildlife,

destroying their natural insulation from cold. Once ingested, oil moves up

the food chain from tiny plankton to fish, birds and even humans, and can

cause reproductive problems, weakness and death.

Even a thin film of oil can kill aquatic organisms that live near the water’s

surface. The cumulative effect of small spills has a serious impact on

coastal and inland waters.

To prevent pollution from oil and gas spills and help maintain a healthy and

aesthetically pleasing recreational environment for boaters and others:

Use caution when filling your fuel tank and don’t top off. Know the

capacity of your tank and leave it at least 10 percent empty

Catch fuel drips with an absorbent pad. Properly dispose of saturated

absorbents at a hazardous waste disposal location.

Don’t hose down gas spills or apply detergents or soaps to remove fuel

or oil sheen in the water. Using soap for this purpose is both bad for the

environment and illegal.

Install fuel tank vent whistles or fuel/air separators (available at any

marine supply store) to avoid spills.

Inspect fuel lines and hoses periodically. Replace as needed.

Use funnels for pouring oil and keep a supply of oil absorbent pads

onboard for cleaning up spills.

Dispose of used oil and drained oil filters at a waste oil recycling center.

If a spill occurs, notify marina management immediately.

All oil and chemical spills must be reported to the National Response

Center 800-424-8802 and the State Line 800-OILS911 (800-645-7911). Visit

www.earth911.

org

or call 800-CLEANUP (800-253-2687) for your nearest

oil, recycling and hazardous waste disposal center.

Bilge Oil

Ninety percent of oil in marine waters is from small, chronic sources such

as bilges, outboard motors, poor fueling procedures, urban run-off and

improper disposal of used oil products. You can help protect California’s

waterways by preventing oily bilge water from being pumped overboard.

Keep engines well tuned; regularly check seals, gaskets, hoses, and

connections for leaks and drips. Change oil filters often.

Use drip pans with oil absorbent pads while draining oil from the bilges.

Use an oil absorbent in the bilge to capture unexpected leaks. The

absorbents will capture oil before the bilge pump discharges it into

the water. Discard used oil absorbents at a household hazardous waste

collection center. Also consider installing an oil/water separator.

Clean and maintain bilges. Do not use detergents while cleaning.

Don’t mix used oil with other substances.

Precautions: When using oil absorbents in the bilge, secure them to

prevent clogging or fouling the bilge pump float or sensor. Oil and fuel

are flammable. Keep oil and fuel-saturated absorbents away from heat or

sources of ignition and in well-ventilated areas.

Remove oily bilge water at a bilge pumpout station.

Remember: Under the Harbors and Navigation Code, it is unlawful to

discharge oil into or upon the navigable waters of California

Oily Waste Discharge Placard

Federal law requires all boats 26 feet or longer to display an Oily Waste

Discharge Placard in the engine compartment or near the fuel tank. For

more information, contact the Coast Guard at

www.uscgboating.org.

Aquatic Invasive Species

Non-native aquatic species

—plants, fish and animals—are invading our

state’s coastal and inland waters. These pests can increase dramatically

under the right conditions, displacing native species, clogging waterways,

and impacting navigation and recreation. Once introduced, they are nearly

impossible to eliminate. Hydrilla,

Egeria densa,

Water Hyacinth, and quagga

and zebra mussels are some of the nuisance species that can be accidentally

transported by recreational boaters when caught in propellers or intakes

or attached to hulls. Controlling these aquatic invasive species is a multi-

million dollar problem in California.

You can help prevent the introduction and spread of non-native species from

one body of water to another by cleaning, draining and drying your boat

and by taking these steps:

Avoid chopping vegetation with your boat’s propeller.

Inspect your boat and remove aquatic plants or animals before you leave

any body of water.

Inspect all exposed surfaces. Small mussels feel like sandpaper to the touch.

Wash the hull of each watercraft thoroughly.

Drain all water and dry all areas.

Drain and dry the lower outboard unit.

Clean and dry all live-wells.

Empty and dry any buckets.

Dispose of all bait in the trash.

There are specific drying times that need to be calculated by each boater.

Please refer to

www.100thmeridian.org/Emersion.asp

to calculate.

Be sure to report new infestations of non-native aquatic species to the

U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service at (209) 946-6400. Visit

www.dbw.ca.gov

for

more information on quagga and zebra mussels or call (866) 440-9530.

Solid Waste and Marine Debris

Trash in the water or washed up on a beach is unsightly and can injure or

kill birds, fish and marine mammals. Ingestion of plastic waste or entangle

ment in fishing lines and nets can result in mortalities. Floating debris and

solid objects may cause structural boat damage or mechanical failures.

As a boater, you can help keep our waters clean and prevent fish and

wildlife injuries by managing and disposing of all solid waste properly.

Never throw trash overboard.

Prevent plastic bags, drink cans and loose items from blowing

overboard.

Carry a trash bag and bring whatever you take out back to port for

proper disposal.

Take reusable containers and recycle paper, cans and bottles.

Encourage your marina to provide trash cans with lids and recycling

bins.

While on your boat, pick up any litter or marine debris that can be safely

reached with a net and dispose of it properly. Participate in a local beach

or marina cleanup event. Call 800-CLEANUP or visit

coastforu.org

for

organized events in your area.

Note: Under the Maritime Pollution Act (MARPOL) International Convention

to Prevent Pollution From Ships and U.S. federal regulations, it is illegal

for any vessel to discharge plastics or garbage containing plastics into U.S.

navigable waters.

Don’t let fishing lines, polysterene, plastic bags, or six-pack rings get

released or blown overboard. Stow trash securely and always bring it back

to shore. Cigarette butts are the most common type of litter found washed

up on beaches and are not biodegradable. Place extinguished cigarette butts

in the trash. Take used monofilament fishing line back to a recycle bin at a

participating boating facility:

http://g.co/maps/brqvk.

Marine Pollution Placard

Federal law now requires all boats 26 feet or more in length, when

operating in waters under U.S. jurisdiction, to display an informational

placard on federal marine pollution prevention laws. You must display the

required placard detailing these prohibitions in a prominent location where

passengers and crew can read it. Placards must be at least nine inches wide

by four inches high and made of durable material bearing letters at least

¹⁄

8

inch high. They can be purchased at marine supply dealers

Household Hazardous Waste

Topside and anti-fouling paints, wood preservatives, lacquers, solvents,

batteries, used oil, zinc anodes and out-of-date flares are typical hazardous

wastes generated by boaters. Some are suspected carcinogens, and all are

toxic to humans and aquatic life. Do your part to control household hazard

ous waste.

Use non-toxic, biodegradable products when possible.

Never dispose of hazardous wastes in the trash, water or gutter.

Use the smallest amount of a toxic product necessary to do the job.

Place ignitable paint waste and old gasoline in closed containers to

prevent pollution or fire.

Check with your marina before disposing of used oil or other hazardous

wastes. Some marinas provide recycling/disposal service.

All boaters must dispose of hazardous waste properly. Call 800-CLEANUP

(800-253-2687), visit

earth911.org

, or contact your local solid waste author

ity for instructions on how and where to properly dispose of household

hazardous waste and to find a disposal location near you.

Sewage

Untreated sewage discharged from boats can spread diseases, contaminate

shellfish beds and lower oxygen levels in water. Exposure to sewage-

polluted water can result in gastroenteritis, hepatitis, dysentery and cholera.

Discharging raw sewage into any of California’s lakes, rivers, reservoirs

or coastal waters within three miles of shore is prohibited within U.S.

navigable waters. State law also prohibits dumping any human waste

(treated or untreated) in a marina, yacht harbor, fresh water lake, or fresh

water impoundment from any vessel tied to any dock, slip or wharf that has

toilet facilities available for the use of people on the vessel.

A state or local peace officer who reasonably suspects that a vessel is

discharging sewage in a prohibited area may board that vessel, if the owner

or operator is aboard, to inspect the MSD for proper operation and to place a

dye tablet in the holding tank.

One of DBW’s goals is to eliminate overboard discharge of sewage through

increased use of pumpout facilities and porta-potty dump stations. You can

help by:

Never dumping raw sewage into California waters.

Using public toilets onshore before departing.

Using a pumpout facility to dispose of holding tank wastes.

On small boats, using a porta-potty and disposing

of wastes in an onshore dump station or toilet.

Keeping the “Y” valve properly secured in the

closed position (to prevent accidental discharge)

when navigating inland waters or less than

three miles offshore.

Reducing the use of chemical additives

containing formaldehyde, quaternary ammonia and chlorine.

For California pumpout locations, visit

www.dbw.ca.gov

and click on the

“Environment” tab. Visit

www.coastal.ca.gov/ccbn/marinaoilsewage.pdf

for mobile boat-to-boat services.

No Discharge Areas

It is illegal to release wastes, treated or not, into a federally designated

No Discharge Area

. Your marine sanitation device (MSD) must be connected

to a holding tank or secured to prevent all sewage discharges.

Graywater

Water from onboard sinks, washers and showers is called graywater, which

is discharged directly into the water without treatment. Graywater is often

full of phosphates that pollute the water and encourage the growth of

unwanted algae. The discharge of graywater is prohibited in some harbors

and marinas. Check with marina personnel for local restrictions.

To help reduce the amount of graywater discharged:

Use shore-side laundry facilities and showers whenever possible.

Limit the amount of water you use in your boat’s sinks and showers.

Use non-phosphate and biodegradable soaps.

Use the smallest amount of a cleaning product to get the job done.

Fish Waste Management

The amount of fish waste disposed into a small, enclosed basin can exceed

amounts found naturally in the water. In small quantities, this fish waste

is eaten by scavenging fish and is not a problem. In large amounts where

water circulation is restricted, decomposition of fish waste can deplete the

water of dissolved oxygen, leading to water quality degradation and fish

kills. “Fish feeding” with bait or cleaned fish loads basins with nutrients

and can disrupt the feeding behavior of wild animals or spread disease

among them.

Always practice proper fish-cleaning methods and proper disposal of

fish wastes.

Dispose of unwanted bait at sea.

Gut fish and dispose of the contents at sea.

Use fish cleaning stations with trash receptacles and wastewater

hookups.

Waste Management Plan

All U.S. vessels 40 feet or more in length and equipped with a galley

and berthing must carry a written Waste Management Plan if the vessel

operates beyond three miles from shore. The Waste Management Plan

must designate the person in charge of carrying out the plan and describe

procedures for collecting, processing, storing and properly disposing of

garbage in keeping with the prohibitions listed on page 51.

.

Proper Vessel Disposal

Proper vessel disposal is a vital part of clean and responsible boating.

Because there are several environmental hazards associated with old ves

sels, including used oil, solvents and used batteries, it is important that you

properly dispose of your vessel at the appropriate time.

Never

abandon or sink your vessel to dispose of it; not only does it pose an

environmental and navigational hazard on our state’s waterways but also it is

illegal. Failure to comply with the law is punishable by a fine of up to $3,000.

There are several options for proper vessel disposal: donation, recycling,

dismantling, and DBW’s Vessel Turn-In Program.

Donation

: Some charities accept motorboats, sailboats, personal watercraft,

and other vessels, as tax-deductible donations. The boat will generally need

to be in decent condition to use as a donation.

Recycling:

Used boat part dealers, or salvagers, may accept your old vessel

for its parts, which they resell. Each dealer will compensate the boat owner

for the value of the useable parts minus the total cost of dismantling the

vessel and recycling or disposing of hazardous wastes; however each dealer

has its own specific requirements for the length and type of vessel they will

accept.

Dismantling:

Some used boat dealers will dismantle and dispose of a vessel

that has no redeemable value. Each dealer has its own requirements for

vessel length and type, and each dealer will charge for this service. The

costs usually run between $15 and $20 per foot and include transportation,

labor, disposal, and recycling or disposing of used oil and other hazardous

materials.

Vessel Turn-In Program:

Check with your local public agencies to see if

they’re participating in DBW’s Vessel Turn-in Program.

Emergency Telephone System: 911

24-Hour Vessel Assistance (Fees Involved): 800-367-8222

Californians Turn in Poachers and Polluters: 888-DFG-CALTIP

(888-334-2258)

AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES

877-STOP-ANS (877-786-7267)

www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/quaggamussel/

www.dbw.ca.gov/boaterinfo/quaggaloc.aspx

BOATING FACILITY LOCATOR

w w w.dbw.ca.gov/maps/facilit y index.asp

BOATING SAFETY

Boating Safety Courses, Classes and Laws:

w w w.dbw.ca.gov

or

888-326-2822

CLEAN BOATING INFORMATION

Boating Clean and Green Program: 415-904-6905 or

www.coast4u.org

or

w w w.dbw.ca.gov

(click on the “Environment” tab)

HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL INFORMATION, US ENVIRONMENTAL

PROTECTION AGENCY

Hazardous Waste, Recycling or Collection Centers: 800-CLEANUP

www.earth911.org

MARINE WILDLIFE RESCUE

OIL AND CHEMICAL SPILLS

To Report Oil and Chemical Spills – National Response Center:

800-424-8802 (CH 16) and California Office of Emergency Service:

800-OILS911 (800-645-7911)

REPORTING DEAD MARINE MAMMALS

Del Norte and Mendocino Counties – Humboldt State University Vertebrate

Museum (whales, dolphins, seals, sea lions, and sea turtles): 707-826-4872

Los Angeles and Orange Counties – Los Angeles County Museum

of Natural History (whales and dolphins): 323-585-5105

Monterey County – Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (whales, dolphins,

seals, sea lions, and sea turtles): 831-755-8650

National Marine Fisheries Service (seals, sea lions and sea turtles):

562-980-4017

Santa Cruz County – Long Marine Laboratory (whales, dolphins, seals,

sea lions, and sea turtles): 831-459-2883

San Diego County – Southwest Fisheries Science Center (whales, dolphins,

seals, sea lions, and sea turtles): 858-546-7162

San Luis Obispo through Santa Barbara Counties – Santa Barbara Museum

of Natural History (whales, dolphins and sea turtles): 805-682-4711, Ext.156

Sonoma County through San Mateo County – California Academy of

Sciences (whales, dolphins, seals, sea lions, and sea turtles): 415-379-5381

Ventura County – Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute (whales,

dolphins, seals, sea lions, and sea turtles): 805-567-1506

SEWAGE PUMPOUT

Sewage Pumpout Locations: 800-CLEANUP (800-253-2687) or contact your

harbormaster for the most current listings of pumpout stations

w w w.dbw.ca.gov

SOCIAL MEDIA SITES

 

Remember – when following all rules – this is “the most fun thing to do in Puerto Rico”.  Charter a sunset sail at Sail Old San Juan and enjoy the breathtaking views of the old city. Please let us know how we can improve the experience and safety.